Stumbling Toward Enlightenment

Gatherings from the Internet

26/09/2016
by barenose
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Remember the Ladies: Bessie Smith

Smith had a powerfully strong voice that recorded very well from her first record, made during the time when recordings were made acoustically. With the coming of electrical recording (her first electrical recording was “Cake Walking Babies (From Home)” recorded Tuesday, May 5, 1925), the sheer power of her voice was even more evident. She was also able to benefit from the new technology of radio broadcasting, even on stations that were in the segregated south. For example, after giving a concert for a white-only audience at a local theater in Memphis, Tennessee, in October 1923, she then performed a late night concert on station WMC, where her songs were very well received by the radio audience. Continue reading

03/09/2015
by barenose
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Remember the Ladies: Prudence Crandall

Prudence Crandall (September 3, 1803 – January 28, 1890), a schoolteacher raised as a Quaker, stirred controversy with her education of African-American girls in Canterbury, Connecticut. Her private school, opened in the fall of 1831, was boycotted when she admitted a 17-year-old African-American female student in the autumn of 1833, resulting in what is widely regarded as the first integrated classroom in the United States. Continue reading

27/04/2015
by barenose
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White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard to Talk to White People About Racism

“Getting it” when it comes to race and racism challenges our very identities as good white people. It’s an ongoing and often painful process of seeking to uncover our socialization at its very roots. It asks us to rebuild this identity in new and often uncomfortable ways. But I can testify that it is also the most exciting, powerful, intellectually stimulating and emotionally fulfilling journey I have ever undertaken. It has impacted every aspect of my life—personal and professional. Continue reading

22/05/2014
by barenose
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The Race Wealth Gap Is Even Worse Than You Think

In the same week the NBA handed down its verdict, a new study released by the Center for Global Policy Solutions and the Network on Race and Ethnic Inequality at Duke University reported that African American households are beyond broke, owning only six cents for every dollar of wealth owned by the typical white household and possessing an average liquid wealth of only $200, a figure that includes the value of African American retirement savings. Continue reading

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